10 Oct 2014

What are the Most Valuable Fabergé Eggs?

Fabergé Eggs were originally made for Russian aristocrats who liked to celebrate Easter not with chocolate, but with giant jeweled eggs polished with the tears of peasants. Although many knockoff “Fabergé” eggs now exist, there are only 65 true Fabergé Eggs in the world. However, many are still unaccounted for, and may be collecting dust in antique shops and personal collections around the world, waiting to be discovered.

Faberge Eggs

#1. Third Imperial Fabergé Egg. Since the days of the stars, you’d there would be less demand for big egg jewelry, but there’s actually more. The price of many of these eggs has increased, allowing some people to make an absolute killing buying up eggs for their face value and selling them to collectors. Let’s look at some of the great egg trades of the world. In quite possibly the most profitable egg hunt of all time, an American scrap metal dealer picked up a Fabergé Egg in a curiosity shop for about $14,000. The seller thought this was a reasonable price, as it reflected the value of the gems and precious metals in the egg. What the seller did not know was that the egg was created as a gift to the Russian Empress. The American scrap dealer has posted it for auction, where it is expected to go for 34 million dollars: a profit of 240,000%!

#2. Viktor Vekselberg’s collection. Russia might well have the world’s greatest concentration of billionaires with more money than sense. The new Russian aristocracy has a taste for spending their 21st century oil money on 19th century curiosities. No man has taken this quite as far as Viktor Vekselberg, Russia’s Rockefeller-esque oil baron. Viktor Vekselberg has spent over $100 million dollars purchasing nine Fabergé Eggs. To put that in perspective, Vekselberg bought the eggs with the equivalent of the yearly wages of 11,000 ordinary Russian workers!

#3. The Rothschild Egg. Most people never knew this egg existed until it showed up for auction at Christie’s in 2007. Although the records of this egg’s creation were destroyed in the Russian Revolution, experts have verified that it produced by the Fabergé workshop for the French Rothschild banking family. It sold for 17.4 million dollars. Because it contains a small clock, it is also the world’s most expensive timepiece of any kind.

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